Roger Federer: Why world’s greatest tennis player Roger Federer was forced to retire from tennis ?—

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The world’s greatest tennis player Roger Federer has announced his retirement from tennis. The Laver Cup, which starts in London next week, will be the last tournament of his tennis career.

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Swiss tennis player Roger Federer is the first tennis player to win 20 Grand Slams in men’s singles.

One of the greatest players in the world, Roger Federer has had a wonderful tennis cricket career. On 15 September 2022, Swiss tennis player Roger Federer announced his retirement by sharing a post on Twitter.

Roger Federer tweeted on Twitter that “I am 41 years old. I have played more than 1500 matches in 24 years. Tennis has treated me more generously than ever before and now I have to recognize when this is the end of my competitive career “

Roger Federer has won a total of 20 Grand Slams in men’s singles so far, Roger Federer became the first tennis player in the world to win 20 Grand Slams in men’s singles. Roger Federer had set this record by winning the Australian Open on 28 January 2018.

But after this title, the effect of the age of 41-year-old Roger Federer started showing on his form and fitness. Since then, Roger Federer has been facing many injuries and surgeries. Due to these reasons, Roger Federer could not participate in a single Grand Slam in the year 2022.

Roger Federer has not won a single Grand Slam since 2018 due to injuries and surgery. Due to increasing age, every great player, no matter how many successes he achieves, one day he has to say goodbye to his profession. And that day also came for the world’s greatest tennis player, Roger Federer.

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